Craig Klugman, Ph.D. is a professor of bioethics and health humanities at DePaul University where he co-directs the Bioethics & Society minor program. Dr. Klugman also serves on the ethics committee at Northwestern University Hospital. He is the author of over 450 articles, book chapters, OpEds, and blog posts on such topics as bioethics, digital medicine, professionalism, end-of-life issues, public health ethics, research ethics, education, health/medical humanities, ethics of execution, and health policy. He is the blog editor and frequent writer for bioethics.net as well as creator of the BioethicsTV column. Dr. Klugman is the editor of several books including Research Methods in the Health Humanities (Oxford 2019), Medical Ethics (Gale Cengage 2016), and Ethical Issues in Rural Health (Hopkins 2013; 2008). He is the executive producer of the award winning film Advance Directives and has developed programs for using art and improvisational theater to teach health students. He serves as chair of ethics for the Illinois Crisis Standards of Care Task Force and is co-founding chair of the Health Humanities Consortium. Dr. Klugman frequently gives talks to universities, medical and nursing groups, companies, and community organizations. He has been interviewed for The New York Times, AARP NewsNightline, Vice, and national radio. Besides numerous academic journals, his writing has appeared in Pacific Standard Magazine, Huffington Post, LifeMattersMedia, Chicago Tribune, Medium, Cato Unbound, The Hill, San Francisco Chronicle and the Houston Chronicle.

My blogs this week

Attacks On Abortion Liberty Are Also Attacks on Physician Autonomy
“What would it mean if Ob/Gyns fled Alabama and Georgia? Those states already have among the worst stats for women’s health such as high maternal mortality rates. These bills will do more than send abortion underground, they will send doctors packing, increasing the risks to women who seek abortion as well as to those who carry to term. It is essential that those of us in the health care fields push back against attempts by legislators to control medical decisions that rightfully belong in the patient-provider relationship. “

 


BioethicsTV (May 13-17) #NewAmsterdam; #ChicagoMed

Interview in the DePaulia

Interviewed on ethics of raising the age at which people can purchase tobacco.

“If the law is passed, you have 20-year-olds who can be shipped off to war and die for their country, and yet, don’t have the freedom to buy a cigarette or a drink,” Klugman said. “You can go die but can’t smoke or drink. There’s a question of fairness there.”

Lee, Ella (2019, April 15). Tobacco 21 bill rises from the ashes. The DePaulia.

Humanities Teaching in Medical Schools

Klugman CM (2018). Medical Humanities Teaching in North American Allopathic and Osteopathic Medical Schools. Journal of Medical Humanities. DOI: 10.1007/s10912-017-9491-z

Although the AAMC requires annual reporting of medical humanities teaching, most literature is based on single-school case reports and studies using information reported on schools’ websites. This study sought to discover what medical humanities is offered in North American allopathic and osteopathic undergraduate medical schools. An 18-question, semistructured survey was distributed to all 146 (as of June 2016) member schools of the American Association of Medical Colleges and the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine. The survey sought information on required and elective humanities content, hours of humanities instruction, types of disciplines, participation rates, and humanities administrative structure. The survey was completed by 134 schools (145 AAMC; 31 AACOM). 70.8% of schools offered required and 80.6% offered electives in humanities. Global health and writing were the most common disciplines. Schools required 43.9 mean (MD 45.4; DO 37.1) and 30 (MD 29; DO 37.5) median hours in humanities. In the first two years, most humanities are integrated into other course work; most electives are offered as stand-alone classes. 50.0% of schools report only 0-25% of students participating in humanities electives. Presence of a certificate, concentration or arts journal increased likelihood of humanities content but decreased mean hours. Schools with a medical humanities MA had a higher number of required humanities hours. Medical humanities content in undergraduate curriculum is lower than is indicated in the AAMC annual report. Schools with a formal structure have a greater humanities presence in the curriculum and are taken by more students.

Educator, writer, and consultant in bioethics and health humanities