New media coverage

Recent media interviews:

Knowles, Francine. (2019, December 30). Talk To Your Family Now About Advance Care Directives. Chicago Tribune Daily Southtown.

“When people fail to take care of these matters, “you are pretty much leaving the decisions up to people who may not know what you want,” said Craig Klugman, a professor in the Health Sciences at DePaul University, who teaches courses in bioethics, medical humanities and death and dying. In the absence of a medical power of attorney you “could be opening your family up to fights over who makes decisions,” he said. “I’ve seen in the hospital families torn apart because people have different ideas about what the parent would have wanted or the aunt would have wanted.””


Hu, Jane C. (2019, December 9). How Do We Know When Research Participants Truly Give Consent? Future Tense. Slate.

“Such a system may also end up continuing science’s legacy of Western paternalism. “Requiring a rule of assurance and submitting copies of the consent documents might be culturally elitist—it places the Western standard of autonomy above all other ways of thinking of people—placing the individual over the group,” says Craig Klugman, a professor of bioethics at DePaul University. Not every community privileges individual consent in the way Westerners do. Klugman points out that some people may seek permission from a parent, spouse, or village elder.”


North, Bonnie (2019, December 2). A Slippery Slope: Medicine, Technology & Bioethics. Lake Effect. WUWM Milwaukee Public Radio.


Pandika, Melissa (2019, October 13). Young blood may hold the weapons for targeting age-related diseases. Chemical and Engineering News 97(40).

“Treatments that deliver individual factors targeting specific conditions may feel more palatable than dystopian scenarios of forced blood donation by the young, but they still raise thorny ethical questions. Most likely only the wealthy would have access to these factors, which are not likely to be covered by insurance or Medicare and Medicaid, says Craig M. Klugman, a bioethicist at DePaul University. This, in turn, could result in a healthier, longer-lived wealthy class and shorter-lived middle- and lower-income classes. Klugman also notes that improving the lives of the majority by devoting resources to their basic needs—which we can already do—“outweighs the science fiction dreams of a few.””

 

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